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Salon des Vins de Loire, Day 2

Day two at the Salon des Vins de Loire was a day for the important estates of Anjou. I have to admit I did have a couple of little detours to Muscadet though, to check in on Domaine du Haut Bourg first, and later in the day the can’t-miss domaine of Luneau-Papin. And I suppose the tastings of Chinon and Menetou-Salon that I undertook don’t count either. But otherwise it was a day for Anjou. Honest!

After a brief stop-off to taste the wines of Eric Morgat, where both the domaine and the style of wine has certainly evolved over the last few years, I kicked off with Jo Pithon and family at Pithon-Paillé. First was a vertical tasting of all the wines they have ever made from Les Treilles, the vertiginously sloped vineyard which looks down onto the Layon. Well, I say all; they decided not to show the 2004, as they have only one bottle left, which seems fair enough. In other older vintages they have (or rather had) only a couple of bottles; it made me realise how precious the 2008s and 2009s lying in my cellar might soon become, and I made a mental note to hold some back for tasting far into the future. Having tasted back to 2005 the wines, which in most vintages are still fresh as a daisy, certainly deserve to be given time.

Then it was onto a tasting of the full range of wines from Yves Guégniard and his daughter Anne of Domaine de la Bergerie, followed up by Vincent and Catherine Ogereau of Domaine Ogereau, and culminating with Claude Papin (pictured below) of Château Pierre-Bise. These three Anjou stalwarts each make an extensive range of wines under all the Anjou appellations, and there were plenty of good wines from these three domaines, which is remarkable considering many came from difficult vintages such as 2013 and 2012.

Claude Papin

Finishing my Anjou tastings ahead of schedule was what allowed my detours into Chinon and Menetou-Salon, where in the first instance I tasted with Anne-Charlotte Genet. Anne-Charlotte now runs Domaine Charles Joguet, working with their winemaker Kevin Fontaine. This is a domaine where quality has varied over the years, but has at times flirted with greatness, with the 1989 Charles Joguet Chinon Clos de la Dioterie I drank last October being one of my favourite bottles of the entire year. Certainly, as Anne-Charlotte and Kevin showed an attractive range of wines from 2012, a vintage in which the Chinons tend to be full of bright fruit but also have very noticeable acidity, these wines showed a more appealing balance than some of their peers. The Clos de la Dioterie, with its silky and well-defined fruit, was particularly good.

As I talked with Anne-Charlotte the issue of some wines I tasted a year or two ago came up. I tasted the wines in London, in a Loire tasting hosted by Charles Sydney, a well-known Loire courtier who does a lot to help Loire growers with making and marketing their wines. The wines had, from memory, been very gamey and farmyardy, and I thought the problem was Brett. Other critics, Anne-Charlotte told me, had also noted the gamey character. Anne-Charlotte’s response was to have the wines analysed for Brett – there wasn’t any, so I got that wrong – but that doesn’t change the fact that they were certainly very gamey to taste. Anne-Charlotte and Kevin decided that some of the changes recently made in the vineyard must be responsible for the character, and they changed things further. And the 2012s are certainly free of any such gamey notes, so whatever changes they have made, it seems like it may have had some beneficial effect.

Domaine Charles Joguet is an example of a domaine on the way back up, and it is one I will have to try to keep a closer eye on in coming years. I have some vintages – off the top of my head certainly 2005, possibly 2003 too – in the cellar, and maybe I will be adding more in the future. It is also an example of a domaine where criticism can be taken on board, and responded to in an appropriate fashion. This, more than the way the 2012s showed, fills me with confidence for the future of the domaine. Kudos to Anne-Charlotte and her team for that.

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