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Renaissance 2014, Day 2: More discoveries

Sunday was another busy day of tasting and chatting with the growers here in Angers; well, for it to have been anything else would have been a surprise wouldn’t it? I went to the Renaissance tasting again; I decided to return for a second day, rather than head off to a different tasting, because there were just so many growers here that I didn’t get time to chat with and to taste with on Saturday.

The tasting started a little more slowly on Sunday morning than it did on Saturday morning (hmmm… I wonder why?). Louis-Jean Sylvos of Château de la Roche en Loire was there early though and I kicked off with his wines, which were true to his house style, interesting appley yet minerally Chenin Blancs and vibrant fruit in his reds, blends of Cabernet Franc, Grolleau and Côt. Louis-Jean is a charming guy, always smiling, and that personality comes through in his wines I think.

Michel Gendrier

After focusing on Saumur and Saumur-Champigny last year I wasn’t really intending to extend my coverage this year, and yet I seem to be doing that, as I tasted with Mathieu Vallée of Château Yvonne, and also Guillaume Pire of Château de Fosse-Sèche. These weren’t the most impressive and surprising wines of the morning though, as these came from Cheverny and Cour-Cheverny, from two domaines with adjacent tables. First was Michel Gendrier (pictured above, mid-pour) of Domaine des Huards, and then Michel Quenioux of Domaine de Veilloux. The first makes an interesting range of Cour-Chevernys, all 100% Romorantin of course, that come in a rather pure and focused style, all the evolving complexity coming from the fruit and nothing else. He also made some really good red Cheverny; these wines, and his Cour-Chevernys, prove that even the most obscure appellations and blends (I am quite confident only the Loire geeks will know that red Cheverny is Gamay and Pinot Noir, with minor contributions from Cabernet Franc and Côt) can bring joy. Thank heavens the entire world hasn’t been planted with Cabernet Sauvgnon and Chardonnay as some would wish. Next door, Michel Quenioux made some really good wines, all Cheverny, where he blends Sauvignon Blanc with Arbois; using Arbois (or Menu Pineau as it is also known) rather than the more common Chardonnay really influences the character of the wines here, and I really liked some of them. In short, these two estates turn out some of the best Chevernys I have tasted. Another victory for diversity and obscure grape varieties!

François Pinon

I tasted many more wines, some of which I won’t dwell on, but special mention must go to Sylvain Potin of Clau de Nell, an estate new to me. This is a very new project funded by Anne-Claude Leflaive, with three wines, all red, a Grolleau (Anne-Claude obviously doesn’t mind engaging with a little obscurity), a Cabernet Franc and a blend of the two Cabernets. These are swish, concentrated, textured wines, the Grolleau of remarkable quality, perhaps one of the best I have tasted, the other wines no less interesting. I enjoyed Sylvain’s cheeky humour and learning about the estate, and will obviously be writing up this new addition to the Anjou portfolio soon.

Finally, I spotted a few notable vignerons who weren’t exhibiting at the tasting but were visiting, no doubt to meet old friends, to taste and to chat. Catherine Roussel of Clos Roche Blanche was one, François Pinon (pictured above) another. François was, as most readers will already know, one of the worst-hit by the hail last June, losing his entre 2013 crop. I didn’t get a chance to speak to him at Renaissance but if I see him at the Salon I will find out more.

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