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2013 Reflections: Bordeaux

Looking back at the past twelve months, I see Bordeaux has kept me busy just as much as the Loire, perhaps more so. I visited the region twice, for eight days in April, and then three days in October, taking in predominantly the wines of the 2012 and 2011 vintages respectively. These were the most significant updates of the year, with a 73,000-word report for Bordeaux 2012 with 350 tasting notes, and a 22,000-word report and 120 new notes for Bordeaux 2011. Thanks to the annual Ten-Years On Tasting hosted by Bordeaux Index I was able to make a thorough review of 2003 Bordeaux (11,000-word report, 70+ notes), and earlier in the year I published a review on 2010 Bordeaux (22,000 words, 120+ notes), following tastings late in 2012. I’ve also published a briefer look back at Bordeaux 2000 with wines from my cellar (16 notes). That’s not a bad schedule for twelve months, and I don’t think there is any other source of Bordeaux coverage – in print or online – that is as broad or as detailed. If there is, please do let me know – I might just subscribe.

To me, though, taking all the enjoyment from wine that is possible isn’t something that can be achieved through lists of notes and scores. It’s a buying guide, but it doesn’t bring you real depth of knowledge. That is why I persist in publishing other Bordeaux reviews, specifically a broad range of new and updated château profiles, as well as tasting updates and other reports – all told I have made over 130 such Bordeaux updates over the last twelve months. The past year has also seen a huge expansion in my Bordeaux guide, now in 44 instalments (a few at the tail-end have yet to be published, but I’m getting there). Hopefully this gives all subscribers, novice or experienced, the required depth of information on Bordeaux. When I finish the Bordeaux guide (I’ve called a temporary halt on updates while I clarify an important discrepancy on the accepted wisdom concerning Bordeaux terroir with contacts in the region) I will roll out one of similar detail for the Loire.

So what of my favourite Bordeaux wines of 2013? As I tend to avoid the Bordeaux party scene during the primeurs, and am not important enough to be invited to dinners where older vintages are poured, most of my favourite wines come from the past decade. Mine won’t be a list rich in 19th- or 18th-century rarities. Still, at least I can honestly state that I have never been duped by a bottle of 1787 Lafite or similar, and I haven’t yet fallen foul of mysterious millionaires pouring unattainable (or indeed impossible) wines, nor has anyone offered me Thomas Jefferson bottles from a suspiciously undisclosed source. In short, there are no fakes on Winedoctor! The wines featured here are also attainable; if any float your boat, there is at least a chance you might be able to track one down, if your wallet is sufficiently bulging, admittedly.

Bordeaux 2013

Early on in the year I published notes on the 2010 vintage, as mentioned above, and I shouldn’t really include these wines here as they were tasted in 2012 nevertheless there is no doubt that this is a great vintage that deserves to be in any Bordeaux-drinker’s cellar. Most striking were the 2010 Château Smith-Haut-Lafitte and 2010 Château Haut Bailly (pictured above) in Pessac-Léognan, in the case of the latter this being just one in a string of brilliant wines I tasted this year. During a visit to Château Haut-Bailly in April I retasted the 2010, which was consistently impressive, but I was equally besotted with the 2009, 2005 and 2000 vintages.

There were also great successes up the left bank, and I fell in love with 2010 Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste (which has since been added to my cellar), as well as 2010 Château Pichon-Baron, 2010 Château Pichon-Lalande and 2010 Château Léoville-Barton. It is not always the highest scoring or most famous names that stick in the mind, however, as one of the most memorable wines was undoubtedly 2010 Château Gloria, punching way above its weight (and also now tucked away in the cellar).

Over on the right bank, 2010 Château Clinet is brooding and memorable, while numerous Sauternes châteaux also made the most of a good vintage; the 2010 Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey, 2010 Château Climens and 2010 Château Coutet are all tip-top. The vintage also showed me what good value everyday drinking Bordeaux can give us, provided we know where to look for it. Appellations such as Montagne-St-Emilion and Castillon are happy hunting grounds, as the 2010 Château Guadet Plaisance and 2010 Château L’Estang proved; I have these names lodged in my memory as a ready response to anyone who says Bordeaux is only for the rich and the foolish.

Bordeaux 2013

The 2012 vintage isn’t likely to throw up any truly great wines, although I was impressed by the 2012 Château Haut-Brion, 2012 Château Lafleur from Jacques Guinaudeau (pictured above) and 2012 Château Clinet on tasting (in keeping with my thoughts that the ‘hot-spots’ in 2012 are Pessac-Léognan and Pomerol). Best of all though was the 2012 Château L’Église-Clinet which, in a perhaps rare moment of concordance (I say perhaps because I generally avoid reading other people’s notes, especially at primeur time) between my palate and that of Robert Parker, this was my favourite wine of the vintage, and his favourite too.

Looking back to wines pulled from my own cellar, the most memorable was certainly the 2000 Château Gruaud-Larose, a wine of huge stature and composition which has an identity crisis, as I believe it thinks it is a first growth. This vintage naturally threw up many good wines, although none that have stuck in my mind like this one. Interestingly, many showed a surprising streak of green, not something I expected from the vintage in question. I have also tasted and reported on a lot of wines from 2003 this year, and it says something about my palate I think that none of these have made it onto my ‘favourite wines’ list – and my tasting history this year includes the supposed ‘greats’ such as 2003 Château Montrose and a number of first growths, left bank and right. No, I’ll pass on the Pavie, thank you.

Bordeaux 2013

My tastings towards the end of the year bring us forward in time once again, to another vintage which, on first inspection, I would have thought would throw up no great wines, in red at least. But the 2011 Château Lafleur is a triumph, even before we take into account the character of the vintage, and although the 2011 Château Palmer (tasted with Thomas Duroux, pictured above) is a notch behind it is a remarkable wine for the vintage and I believe the best in the commune in 2011 (although I have not retasted Château Margaux yet, but this was my impression from the primeurs last year). As for the 2010 Château Margaux, however, tasted in October, this was a true stunner, a great wine from a great vintage.

So 2011 is not much of a success story for reds, but for the sweet whites it is a rocking vintage, with my top three wines (not including Yquem which I didn’t taste this year) being 2011 Château Suduiraut, 2011 Château Climens and 2011 Château Coutet, but there are many other choices of a close level of quality. As with some of the 2010 reds, I have also added one of these three to my cellar (metaphorically at least – it hasn’t been delivered yet), this being the Climens, an estate that I visited and provided an update on earlier this year. The 2010 Château Climens was just as memorable as the 2011, although both were eclipsed by the 2009 Château Climens tasted at the château, and the 2001 Château Climens from my cellar; these are both spectacular wines.

Bordeaux 2013

So as with the Loire, there are plenty of Bordeaux buying and drinking options around; the difference here, of course, is that the prices can be a major barrier to many, me included. But with the very difficult 2013 coming onto the market soon, I suspect it will be to these other vintages that buyers will now turn. But let’s not judge 2013 before it has turned up for the trial; I will go to Bordeaux in April, to the primeurs, to assess quality for myself.

As for 2014, I will finish my Bordeaux guide soon, and continue to add new profiles and update old ones. Expect in-depth reviews of the 2013, 2012, 2010 and 2004 vintages. In the next few months I also have small ‘from my cellar’ reports on the 1999 and 2001 vintages, as well as a large report on Bordeaux 2009, which I alluded to in my recent post on 2009 Giscours. And, if you fancy going to Bordeaux to see it all for yourself, there will be a Winedoctor-led tour with SmoothRed Wine Tours in October. I will publish more details online here soon.

Later in the week, time permitting (hopefully before the year is out), my favourite wines from beyond Bordeaux and the Loire. It might be a short list though!

2 Responses to “2013 Reflections: Bordeaux”

  1. Gloria in excelsis for 2010 then. Thanks for these reflections. As well as for the Loire visits info this year. Good Loire coverage was (and is) for me the main differentiator of Winedoctor.

    Best wishes for 2014.

  2. Raf, thanks for that feedback. More to come in 2014!